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Cockburn US Politics

Does Meghan Markle have her eye on the White House?

‘I know the Duchess of Sussex has political ambitions and I’ve been told that one day she wants to run for President’

June 25, 2020

9:41 AM

25 June 2020

9:41 AM

Lady Colin Campbell, the British socialite who has a steady sideline in royal biographies, has been busy promoting her new book on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. According to Lady C, the Duchess of Sussex allegedly harbors political aspirations.

She told the MailOnline that: ‘I know the Duchess of Sussex has political ambitions and I’ve been told that one day she wants to run for President.’ The newspaper also contained reports that the Duchess has been inspired to get more involved in politics by the Black Lives Matter protests.

It wouldn’t be the first time that an actor has attempted to swap the silver screen for high office. Ronald Reagan and Arnold Schwarzenegger are the most high profile examples, with actresses Stacey Dash from Clueless and Cynthia Nixon from Sex in the City recently throwing their hats into the ring: Dash announced she would run for Congress before dropping out of the race and Nixon ran for governor of New York but was defeated.


Perhaps the Duchess of Sussex will have better luck looking to the UK for inspiration. A number of UK politicians were actors in a former life, including one Michael Gove. The Cabinet Minister starred as a vicar in A Feast at Midnight — a 1994 film about a boarding school secret society.

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Gove’s colleague Esther McVey also tried her hand at acting before politics, starring in a production of The Vagina Monologues at the Liverpool Empire Theatre back in 2014. And two-time Academy Award winner Glenda Jackson famously swapped cinema for Westminster when she became MP for Hampstead and Highgate in 1992.

While there may be a helpful crossover in skills between the two venerable professions, Cockburn notes there is no clear precedent for Western royals entering into politics — perhaps for good reason.

This article was originally published on The Spectator’s UK website.


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