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Cockburn

Accounts of petty crime in London horrify the New York Times

It sounds truly awful

December 13, 2018

8:03 AM

13 December 2018

8:03 AM

Everyone’s favorite Britain-bashing newspaper, the New York Times, is at it again. As Cockburn has noted several times this year, the paper’s coverage of the United Kingdom has rapidly slid from reasonably sensible to completely doolally, as it seeks to prove that the EU referendum has turned the UK into the worst place in existence.

Recent highlights from the publication’s coverage include the suggestion that everyone in London was eating boiled mutton and porridge until a few years ago, that nervous citizens are stockpiling food for a Brexit emergency, and that the town of Prescot has had to close its fire station (it hasn’t).

Clearly not having learned its lesson, it appears that the NYT is on the lookout for some dirt to dish on the country yet again. The publication has put out a call on social media for people to come forward to give their experience of petty crime in the city of London:

As the city’s level of violent crime rises, help us understand how the London police are responding to minor property crimes.

Fortunately, scores of helpful Brits were on hand to offer their own experiences of life in the nation’s capital city:

petty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york timespetty crime london new york times

Listening to those terrible tales, Cockburn can’t wait to see the dystopian hellscape the NYT paints of London in the next edition.

This article was originally published on The Spectator’s UK website.


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