May

From the magazine

May 2020

The Spectator

‘We are told that “we’re in this together” by people who can afford to wait out the epidemic in the way the aristocrats of old retreated to their estates when the plague arrived in the city. It is more accurate to say that we are, as this edition’s cover puts it, “together, alone”.’

Politics

When money dies

$1,200 isn’t going to stretch very far for workers who have lost their jobs, or even for those still employed

By Daniel McCarthy

From the Magazine

A strong constitution

It is a cherished axiom of the psychological class that the human psyche is almost infinitely sensitive and delicate

By Chilton Williamson, Jr.

From the Magazine

Education

Him too: is Alec Klein a predator — or a victim?

An unwanted shoulder rub is a bit sleazy but it hardly places a man beyond redemption

By Amber Athey

From the Magazine

COVID-19 is a terrible snob

Survival of the richest

By Toby Young

From the Magazine

Africa’s invisible epidemics

What I respected about the people in Baidoa was that every famine victim who died was an individual

By Aidan Hartley

From the Magazine

Is there any better place for an EU-subsidized arts festival than Galway?

I hoped my flight would be canceled but we left right on time

By William Cook

From the Magazine

Fear and adrenochrome

The conspiracy theory right is addicted to crazy ideas about a drug

By Ben Sixsmith

From the Magazine

Politics

Will American exceptionalism survive the pandemic?

By and large, the world’s most powerful and most expensive military establishment is not proving terribly relevant

By Andrew Bacevich

From the Magazine

Politics

There are lies, damned lies and epidemiological models

What will be the fatality rate of our insane overreaction?

By Roger Kimball

From the Magazine

Politics

What if a virus were ever used as a WMD?

We ain’t seen nothing yet

By Paul Wood

From the Magazine

Europe

Whatever happened to dissent?

The British have bought the lockdown hook, line and non-thinker

By Lionel Shriver

From the Magazine

Politics

EDITORIAL: After the lockdown, the breakdown

The Trump administration’s $1,200 subvention to citizens is a drop in the swelling ocean of debt

By Spectator Editorial

From the Magazine

Politics

Who will win the corona wars?

History shows plagues are bad for big empires with weak frontiers: ask the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius

By Niall Ferguson

From the Magazine

Politics

Sovereignty rules

The viruses-don’t-respect-borders slogan is dead wrong

By Christopher Caldwell

From the Magazine

Books + Arts

Art

The similarity between Charles Dickens and Armando Iannucci

The director’s new work, The Personal History of David Copperfield, is certainly brave

By Will Lloyd

From the Magazine

Art

Salvant grace

Cécile McLorin Salvant’s shock of the new

By Jacob Heilbrunn

From the Magazine

Art

Difficult women

Marjane Satrapi, the author-director of Persepolis, tells Sarah Ditum about her Marie Curie biopic, exile from Iran and fears for the future of democracy

By Sarah Ditum

From the Magazine

Art

Tom Stoppard in isolation

If it were not for the terrors surrounding us, this is the life I’ve always wanted — social distancing without social disapproval

By Tom Stoppard

From the Magazine

Books

Are women worse navigators than men?

From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way by Michael Bond reviewed

By Sara Wheeler

From the Magazine

Books

Mixed up math

The Mathematics of the Gods and the Algorithms of Men: A Cultural History by Paolo Zellini reviewed

By Michael Barany

From the Magazine

Books

Going both ways

The Bilingual Brain: And What It Tells Us About the Language of Science by

By Philip Hensher

From the Magazine

Books

Dedicated to literature

After Fault Lines, his acclaimed family history, David Pryce-Jones has written another kind of autobiography: Signatures, the memoirs of a bibliophile

By David Pryce-Jones

From the Magazine

Books

Making a killing

The Celestial Hunter by Roberto Calasso reviewed

By Dominic Green

From the Magazine

Art

Joe Exotic is an ordinary American

He is perhaps a little too fond of drugs and weaponry, but he has also overcome great personal misfortune

By James Delingpole

From the Magazine

Life

Low Life

Shrieks, shots and broken china: a visit to my rural French doctor

As we all sat in the waiting room, we wondered what social enormity the doctor might commit next

By Jeremy Clarke

From the Magazine

High Life

Dwelling on death in Gstaad

Living dangerously helps put death in the right perspective

By Taki

From the Magazine

Home

It’s gonna be a long day with myself

Why am I so hungry? Oh because it’s noon and I’ve been on Twitter for four hours

By Bridget Phetasy

From the Magazine

Home

Corona Derangement Syndrome

The virus has driven everyone mad

By Rod Liddle

From the Magazine

Home

Heads in the cloud

Life in the age of COVID-19 is connected but unconnected

By Sam Leith

From the Magazine

Home

Why ‘housewife’ is no more demeaning than ‘husband’

‘Housewife’ meaning ‘woman in charge of a household’ was also sometimes pronounced ‘husif’. By the 16th century it was worn down to ‘hussy’

By Dot Wordsworth

From the Magazine

Home

Climbing the walls

A lockdown challenge in Sri Lanka

By A.S.H. Smyth

From the Magazine

Places

Place

Texas or Hell

‘You can go to Hell, but I am going to Texas,’ said Davy Crockett. I think he had a point

By James Jeffrey

From the Magazine

Place

Ghost riders in the sky

In Lavenham, American history is unlocked by a pint of fine English ale

By Revd Steve Morris

From the Magazine

Food + Drink

Drink

Civilized caffeination

A frothy tour of Vienna’s coffeehouses

By Ysenda Maxtone Graham

From the Magazine

Drink

Upper crust: a sweeter approach to sourdough

According to French tradition, it is wrong to throw away old bread because it is sacred

By Jane Stannus

From the Magazine

Drink

Cooking for dad: real food is nothing fancy

Alison Roman’s tastes are like my father’s: particular, strident and requiring a capacious definition of the word ‘unfussy’

By Mary Kate Skehan

From the Magazine

Drink

Wine is for lovers: mein Gott and yours

I have some good advice about some things you might want to drink after you have gathered with one or two appropriate friends

By Roger Kimball

From the Magazine

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